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Wednesday, May 27, 2015

GLUTEN FREE BAGELS & GF MULTI-GRAIN BAGELS easily made DAIRY FREE

Posted by Bryna Bear aka Gluten Free Baking Bear

     I have made a lot of bagel recipes over the last year.  I started out trying other GF recipes.  They all tasted very good, but some were too hard, some too dry, some like bagel shaped bread.  I wanted a real chewy bagel that was firm yet soft.  Then I decided to convert a wheat recipe into a GF one myself.  I was so happy.  A real bagel.  The white bread bagel had a great chewy texture, but not enough flavor for my liking, so I swapped out some of the white flour for whole grains and a little teff.  This whole grain bagel tastes great but does not get to the same level of chewy as the white bread bagel.  No matter what, both recipes are better then any other recipe or store bought GF bagels I have had in the last 8 years. 
     Perfect with cream cheese and lox or anything else these bagels are delicious.

     I am posting the recipes as I have been baking them.  Feel free to experiment with flours and boiling and baking times to get your favorite bagel experience.  Enjoy!



GF MULTI-GRAIN BAGELS
Makes about 12 

14 oz.
Tapioca Flour
4 oz.
Chickpea Flour
4 oz.
Sweet Rice Flour
4 oz.
Teff Flour
4 oz.
Sorghum Flour
5 oz.
Corn Starch
1 Tbs.
Xanthan Gum
2 cups
Water or Milk or Non Dairy Milk - warmed to 110℉
2 ½ tsp.
Instant Yeast - divided
4 large
Eggs
2 ¾ tsp.
Sea Salt
3 Tbs. 
Honey or Brown Sugar
1 Tbs.
Baking Soda (for boiling the bagels)
1-2 Tbs.
Cornmeal (for dusting the parchment paper)
1
egg white (for brushing on top of the raw bagels before baking) - optional (egg whites will give the bagel a nice shine)
2 Tbs.
Poppy or Sesame Seeds ( to top the bagels) - optional



GLUTEN FREE BAGELS
Makes about 12

26 oz.
Tapioca Flour
4.5 oz.
Chickpea Flour
4.5 oz.
Sweet Rice Flour
1 Tbs.
Xanthan Gum
2 cups
Water or Milk or Non Dairy Milk - warmed to 110℉
2 ½ tsp.
Instant Yeast - divided
4 large
Eggs
2 ¾ tsp.
Sea Salt
1 Tbs. 
Honey or Brown Sugar
1 Tbs.
Baking Soda (for boiling the bagels)
1-2 Tbs.
Cornmeal (for dusting the parchment paper)
1
egg white (for brushing on top of the raw bagels before baking) - optional (egg whites will give the bagel a nice shine)
2 Tbs.
Poppy or Sesame Seeds ( to top the bagels) - optional


Directions
In a large bowl mix the flours and xanthan gum together well.  Set aside. (You will need a total of 35 ounces of GF flours.  If you cannot eat one of the flours in the recipe replace it with an equal weight of another flour.  I cannot guarantee that you will get the same results using different flours, but I’m sure you will get a bagel that tastes better than a store bought one.)
I use a scale to weigh out each flour.

All the flours with the xanthan gum well mixed with a whisk.


Make the sponge:  
  1. Measure out 18 ounces of the flour mixture and place in a large bowl
    Weighing out 18 ounces of flour.
  2. Add 1 1/4 tsp of yeast and mix well.
  3. Add the warmed water or milk and stir together.  Allow this to sit at room temperature for 2 hours.  It should become foamy and increase in size.
    Adding water and yet to the flour.

    Mixing the sponge.

    The regular flour sponge after sitting for 2 hours.

Make the dough:
  1. Add the rest of the yeast to the sponge and stir.
    Whole grain sponge with the rest of the yeast added.
    Note that the sponge rose to the top the bowl and then deflated when I moved it.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer add the sponge, the rest of the flour mixture, sea salt, eggs, and honey or brown sugar.
    The wet ingredients and the sponge.

    The remaining flour added to the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Beat with the dough hook attachment until it is smooth and comes together into a ball (about 6 minutes).
    Starting to mix the dough with a dough hook.
  4. The dough should be firm and pliable, but not sticky.  If you pinch some dough between your fingers it should feel like an ear lobe.  If too dry add some water, if too wet add some tapioca flour or corn starch, an ounce at a time, until the desired consistency is reached.
    Regular GF bagel dough after mixing a few minutes.
    Note that the dough is smooth and is starting to pull away from the sides of the bowl
    and form a ball of dough.

    GF Multi Grain Dough after several minutes of mixing.
    Note that the sides are starting to come away from the bowl and
    that the dough is a little moister than the regular bagel dough.
    It is moister but not tacky.  It does not stick to your hands.

    Multi grain dough.  I am pinching some to check for stickiness and
    to see if it feels sort of like an earlobe.  

Shape the bagels:
  1. Prepare 2 baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper and lightly oiling them.
  2. Using a scale weigh out 4.5 ounce portions of dough or you can divide the dough into 12 equal pieces. (My dough weighs out at least 13 bagels that are 4.5 ounces each every time I make this recipe.)
    Weighing out dough portions.
  3. Form the pieces into balls by rolling them in your hands and then flatten them slightly.
    Rolling out the dough portions into flattened balls.
  4. With a finger, poke a hole in the center of the ball of dough and use your fingers and thumbs to stretch it out into a bagel shape with an opening about 1 ½-2 inches in diameter.  Make the ring of dough as uniform as possible, without some sides too much thicker than others.
    Poking a hole in one portion of rolled dough.


    Stretching and shaping the ball of dough into a ring.
     
  5. As the bagels are formed, place them 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets.
    Shaped bagels ready to rest for 20 minutes.
  6. When all the bagels are shaped and on the baking sheets, cover them with plastic wrap and allow them to rest at room temperature for 20 minutes.  If it is very cold and drafty in the room then let them rest in a warm place.
  7. After 20 minutes test the bagels to see if they are ready to be put in the refrigerator to rise overnight.  Place a bagel into a bowl filled with room temperature water.  If it floats it is ready to go into the fridge.  If it does not float allow the bagels to rest 5 minutes longer and then test again.  Repeat until the bagels float.
    The bagel floats!  Now we can put the bagels in the fridge to rise overnight.
  8. The bagels should rise in the fridge at least over night, but can be left in the fridge up to 2 days before baking.
    Bagels after rising overnight in the fridge.

Bake the bagels:
  1. On baking day, place two oven racks in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 500℉. 
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and then add the baking soda.  Have a slotted spoon or some utensil ready to help turn and remove the bagels from the water.  I used an extra wide slotted spatula.
    Bring a pot of water to a boil and then add baking soda.
  3. Prepare 2 pieces of parchment paper (that fit the baking sheets) by lightly oiling and sprinkling with some cornmeal.
    Oiled parchment paper sprinkled with corn meal.
  4. Remove the bagels from the fridge and place 3 or 4 of them (or as many as will fit comfortably in the pot) in the boiling water.  The bagels should rise to the surface of the water within 10 seconds.  Boil for 1 minute and then turn them over and boil the second side for 1 minute.  For very chewy bagels you can boil them for 2 minutes on each side.  Place the boiled bagels on the same parchment paper that they rose on.  After they rest a minute transfer them to the freshly prepared paper that is oiled and sprinkled with cornmeal.  If you wish to reuse the same parchment paper, dry off the paper a bit and sprinkle with some cornmeal.
    Boiling the bagels, bottom side first.
    I don't think it matters which side you boil first.

    Boiling the second side, bottoms up.
  5. When all the bagels are boiled and placed on the baking sheets you can brush them with egg white and sprinkle with some sesame or poppy seeds.  Place the baking pans of bagels on the 2 middle racks in the preheated oven.
    Boiled bagels ready to be brushed with egg whites.
  6. Bake for 5 minutes, 7 minutes for the whole grain ones, then switch shelves and also rotate the pans 180°.  If the bagels are getting too brown on the top or bottom you can cover the top with foil to prevent excess browning and place the baking pan inside another baking pan to insulate the bottom from the heat and prevent the bottoms from getting too done.
  7. Lower the oven to 450 degrees and bake another 5 minutes, or 7 minutes for the whole grain ones, the bagels should be golden brown.  You can bake them longer if you prefer.
    Multi Grain GF Bagels cooling on a rack.
  8. Cool on the pans or a rack for at least 15 minutes before eating.
  9. You can slice and freeze the bagels and use them later as you want some.  Just reheat or toast the frozen bagels for the most enjoyable eating experience.